Doing Dari

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Persian has multiple dialects. I have been focusing on the one from Iran, often referred to as Farsi here in the U.S., but there are only 30 Pimsleur lessons for it.&nbsp;</p>
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For Dari, the Persian dialect spoken in Afghanistan and one of Afghanistan's two official languages (Pashto is the other), there are 60 Pimsleur lessons.</p>
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<img alt="60 Pimsleur Lessons for Dari!" src="/assets/images/uploads/Dari_Persian.png" style="width: 720px; height: 539px;" /></p>
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60 Pimsleur Lessons for Dari!</p>
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That is double.</p>
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So far I have resisted the persistent temptation to try Dari, because my research--consisting mostly of asking numerous people who speak Persian about this--suggested I would just get too confused.&nbsp;</p>
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However, like stubborn people the world around, I ultimately ignored really good advice (sorry, guys!) and am now on lesson 12 of Dari.&nbsp;</p>
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Yeah, there are challenges. For one thing, the verb endings are sometimes different. The <em>id</em> endings given for formal second-person verbs in the Farsi Persian lessons have given way to something that sounds like <em>en</em>&nbsp;for comparable verbs in Dari.</p>
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In the Farsi lessons, Pimsleur offers <em>mersi</em> for thanks (مرسی). In the same sentences in the Dari lessons, I have been taught <em>tashakor</em> (تشکر), which I believe is also widely understood and used in Iran. (Someone please correct me if I am wrong.)</p>
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I am trying to hold on to the Iranian verb endings while still getting the pretty similar Dari endings right.</p>
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Around lesson 8 I thought I might have to abort the mission, but now I am relaxing into it. There is so much overlap between the two dialects that I think this will help me more than it will mess me up.</p>
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And if it doesn't, I will warn others from my desert island when my ship gets wrecked!</p>

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